September 05, 2013

By DAVID BAUDER

Associated Press

 

NEW YORK — Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff didn't think much about the milestone upon being appointed the first women to co-anchor a national daily news program on television — until flowers began filling their offices and strangers offered congratulations.

The veteran journalists are the regular co-hosts of PBS' “NewsHour,” effective Monday. They will be the faces for a newscast known for many years as the home of founders Jim Lehrer and Robert MacNeil.

Two days earlier, PBS will premiere a new weekend edition of “NewsHour,” based in New York instead of Washington. Hari Sreenivasan will be the host.

In 2006, Katie Couric at the “CBS Evening News” became the first woman to solely anchor a national newscast. Ifill said she was surprised by how many people made a big deal of two women anchors when PBS announced the change in early August.

“I’m very touched by that,” she said. “I’m most touched by young women who stop me on the street and tell me how happy they are about this. I’m amazed at the investment people have in this.”

Following Lehrer’s retirement two years ago, Ifill and Woodruff were part of a five-person anchor rotation with Jeffrey Brown, Ray Suarez and Margaret Warner. Two of the five anchored each night, depending on their schedules. There was nothing wrong with it, said the show’s executive producer, Linda Winslow. But she came to conclude that a regular team makes for a sharper identity; people are more likely to say they watch Brian Williams instead of the NBC “Nightly News,” for example.

The new anchors have lengthy Washington resumes. Woodruff, 66, was a White House correspondent for NBC News during the Carter administration and has two stints at PBS with 12 years at CNN in between. Ifill, 57, started in print, working at The Washington Post and The New York Times, before joining NBC News and then PBS in 1999. Ifill hosts “Washington Week,” meaning Woodruff will fly solo on the “NewsHour” on Fridays.

Both say they share sensibilities and news instincts.

“She’s exactly the kind of person you’d want to have by your side if there’s a big, breaking story,” Woodruff said of her partner. “You want to be beside someone you can trust, whose judgment you can trust.”

Winslow said it seemed to be the combination that clicked. The women think alike, but have distinct styles. During interviews, Ifill is more conversational, Woodruff more questioning. “She’s leaning forward and Gwen is more inviting you to come forward,” she said.

“NewsHour” anchors have often seemed more like solo artists than a team. Winslow said there will be an effort to have Ifill and Woodruff appear on-screen together more and interact.

The show helped draw attention to the pairing when Ifill and Woodruff interviewed President Barack Obama last week, with the poison gas attack in Syria the chief topic.

Even for veteran reporters, a presidential interview is a nerve-wracking experience. You live in fear of missing something obvious. You have to balance to-the-minute reporting of breaking news with more reflective questions knowing, as Ifill said, “all your planning can go out the window in an hour.” And for the two anchors, each had to be conscious of giving her partner equal time.

Both women were also named managing editors of “NewsHour,” joining Winslow in shaping the day’s broadcast.

“It means that every day we wake up, we’re not just thinking about our own segments within the show,” Woodruff said. “It means that every day you’re thinking about the whole program. But that’s a good thing.”

Ifill and Woodruff will bring their own ideas for changes, comfortable knowing that no overhaul is necessary.

“The ‘NewsHour’ occupies a place that doesn’t exist anymore in broadcast television, which is an hour-long, uninterrupted chance to let people finish their sentences,” Ifill said. “We’re very careful of that franchise, but we are also aware of ways that we can freshen it just with our presence.”

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

September 05, 2013

Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

 

Comedian Dave Chappelle angered fans in Hartford, Conn., on Thursday night when he cut short a performance and sat silently on a stool for nearly a half hour before walking off stage amid boos.

NBC Connecticut reported that Chappelle, who was headlining the Funny or Die Oddball Comedy & Curiosity Tour, was on stage at the Comcast Theatre in Hartford for just a few minutes, when he suddenly stopped his routine and said the audience was making too much noise, one witness said.

For the next 25 minutes, he sat on a stool, read from a book, told the crowd he was still getting paid and then eventually walked off the stage, a witness said.

Needless to say, some fans want a refund.

“He didn’t do anything. He just stood there. … He wanted quiet. He wanted everyone to be quiet while he performed,” one audience member said.

Others tweeted, defending Chappelle and blamed the crowd for being unruly.

According to Hartford Police, extra patrols were called in as a precaution and for potential crowd control.

There’s no official word on why Chappelle walked off the stage. The 15-city Funny or Die festival is Chappelle’s first major stand-up tour since he abruptly stopped production of his Comedy Central show and reportedly checked himself into a South African mental health facility in 2005. The next scheduled stop for the tour is tonight in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Information from Eurweb.com and NBC contributed to this report.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

August 29, 2013

By Alan Duke

CNN Wire Service

 

LOS ANGELES — A drug addiction expert who testified that Michael Jackson suffered a “quite extensive” drug addiction ack­nowl­edged there was no evidence the singer used more painkillers than medically necessary.

Dr. Petros Levounis testified Tuesday and Wednesday for AEG Live in its defense of the wrongful death lawsuit filed by Jackson's mother and children.

Lawyers for the concert promoter want to convince jurors that the singer was a secretive addict responsible for his own death from an overdose of the surgical anesthetic propofol. Their executives had no way of knowing the singer was in danger when he was preparing for his comeback concerts in 2009, they contend.

Jackson lawyers contend AEG Live executives are liable because they negligently hired, retained or supervised the doctor who used propofol to treat Jackson’s insomnia as he prepared for his comeback concerts during the last two months of his life.

The conclusion that Jackson was dependent on painkillers was not a revelation, considering Jackson himself announced it when he cut his “Dangerous” tour short to enter a rehab program in 1993.

“If he announced it to the world it's not very private, is it?” Jackson lawyer Michael Koskoff asked Levounis.

“At that moment, he was not secretive,” Levounis replied.

Jackson’s drugs of choice were opioids, painkillers given to him by doctors repairing scalp injuries suffered in a fire and during cosmetic procedures to make him look younger, Levounis testified.

Labeling Jackson an addict could tarnish the singer's image among jurors, but its relevance to AEG Live’s liability is questionable. Opioids played no role in Jackson’s death, according to the Los Angeles County coroner. His June 25, 2009, death was ruled a result of an overdose of propofol.

Dr. Conrad Murray told investigators he infused the singer with propofol for 60 consecutive nights to treat his insomnia so he could rest for rehearsals. The judge would not allow Levounis to testify if he thought Jackson was addicted to propofol.

Levounis said addiction happens when a chemical “hijacks the pleasure-reward pathways” in your brain. “You remain addicted for the rest of your life,” Levounis testified.

“Michael Jackson’s addiction was quite extensive and I have very little doubt that his pleasure-reward pathways had been hijacked and he suffered from addiction,” he said.

Levounis conceded he saw no evidence that Jackson used pain­killers after he left rehab in 1993 until 2001 or between July 2003 and late 2008.

He said it is not inconsistent for an addiction to go into remission.

Under cross examination Wed­nes­day morning, Levounis conceded that he never saw evidence that Jackson injected himself with narcotics, ever sought or used illegal drugs such as cocaine, meth or heroin, or abused drugs to produce euphoria or get high.

There was also no evidence Jackson used more painkillers than doctors prescribed, he said.

Jackson lawyers have never disputed the singer’s drug dependence. In fact, they contend that AEG Live executives, including one who was Jackson’s tour ­manager when he entered rehab, were negligent for paying a doctor $150,000 a month just to treat Jackson. The high salary created a conflict for the debt-ridden Murray, making it difficult for him to say no to Jackson’s demands for drugs.

Paul Gongaware, the AEG Live co-CEO who was in charge of Jackson’s 2009 “This Is It” tour, was also tour manager for his “Dangerous” tour in 1993. Levounis acknowledged in testimony Wed­nes­day that there was evidence that Gongaware knew about Jackson’s painkiller addiction 15 years before his death.

Levounis’ testimony about the dangers of a doctor being too friendly with an addicted patient, which he said Murray was, could help the Jacksons’ case.

“A very close friendship between an addicted patient and a doctor is problematic,” Levounis testified. “It makes it much easier for a patient to ask for drugs and it makes it more difficult for a provider to resist.”

The medical records of Murray’s treatment of Jackson between 2006 and 2008 — when the singer lived in Las Vegas — showed no painkillers prescribed during seven visits. Murray’s notes did show he treated Jackson’s complaints of insomnia with a sedative in 2008.

Wednesday was the 76th day of testimony in the trial, which is expected to conclude near the end of September.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

September 05, 2013

 

By Brandon I. Brooks

Managing Editor

By Kenneth Miller

Asst. Managing Editor

 

You may remember Joe Adams as the legendary manger of musical genius Ray Charles from the motion picture ‘Ray’, but what most people don’t know is Joe Adams was an entertainment innovator, actor, savvy businessman, and legend in his own right.

 

In a rare one on one interview with the Sentinel, Adams reveals stories untold and provides a unique introspective into The Man who was behind The Man.

 

It’s a bright sunny day in the city of Los Angeles and the historical landmark RPM International sits quiet on Washington Blvd.

 

The piano keys are still; the wardrobe closet is flush with Ray Charles jackets, silk shirts, Ballys shoes and pants.
The President of Ray Charles Foundation Valerie Ervin and the rest of us anxiously wait for the man who for many and has been known as the man behind the man.

 

As he carefully navigates each step from the small parking structure up the stair chase into the studio that sits adjacent to the famous recording booth, Joe Adams has arrived.

 

It is a location that he is all too familiar with because he was responsible for designing RPM International Studios where Charles’ genius expanded.

 

There he was, slowed only by his biological clock that now stretches to 89, wearing a dapper purple silk shirt and stylish matching slacks.

 

Adams who for more than four decades teamed with the revolutionary Ray Charles to form an entertainment business model that will never be duplicated, is still managing.

 

These days he sits atop as the Chairman of the Board of The Ray Charles Foundation and his own foundation, the Emma and Joe Adams Foundation, carrying out the wishes that he and his friend shared years before Charles succumbed in 2004.

 

He is responsible for shepherding the legacy of Ray Charles and implementing the philanthropic goals that both men had.

 

It was Adams who presented Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science with a $1-million donation — the largest one-time individual gift in the school’s history in June. The money will be used to fund student scholarships and the donation comes from Joe Adams and his wife, Emma, and will establish the Adams Scholars, which will provide $10,000 to cover tuition for undergraduates based on their financial need.

 

Additionally, Adams is responsible for millions of dollars in ongoing contributions to Morehouse College and a recent $600,000 donation to Spellman College through his charitable foundations.

 

A Los Angeles native who was raised in Watts and proudly recalls his days as a student at Jordan High School, Adams spoke fondly of the influence he received from late Sentinel Publisher Col. Leon H. Washington.

 

“Yes Col. Washington gave me a lot of good advice back then,” Adams remembered. 

 

Adams’ father was a local businessman who owned Gold’s Furniture store on Central Ave. during the late 1960s and 70s, and it was from him that Adams attained his keen sense for business and the astute value of money.
Adams was the son of an African American mother and Jewish father, and his parents were a rare interracial couple at the height of racial segregation and prejudice in the early 1900s.

 

During those days Adams was growing up in Watts when he began honing his talents to become a barrier breaker in radio broadcasting. 

 

It was during this time at a young age that he realized he wanted to do what no African American dared dream of.

 

Adams wanted to become a radio announcer and practiced by shouting aloud in isolated parking lots.

 

Experiencing the brunt of racism growing up as a child, he was determined to not allow his black skin to prevent him from reaching his goal.

 

By the time he was a teenager he was the first African American on radio at Art Grogan’s owned Santa Monica Station KOWL, who gave Adams the opportunity to go on the air in the 1940s.

 

Within two years Adam's daily radio show was the #1 rated deejay show in Los Angeles. During an era when deejays were required to solicit their own sponsors, he attracted an incredible 56 paid advertisers to pay for airtime on KOWL, marking the beginning of an auspicious radio career that eventually spanned twenty years. 

 

Adams branched out into television with two shows of his own, "Adams Alley" for KLAC with a cast of twenty-eight people, and "Joe Adams Presents." He was one of the pioneers of that era, hosting top-name stars and musical greats, among them was Charles. 

 

He also enjoyed success as a film actor, appearing in more than 26 motion pictures. Among his most notable roles was Husky Miller in Carman Jones and as Frank Sinatra's psychiatrist in The Manchurian Candidate. His talent as an actor earned him the Foreign Correspondence Award as the Golden Globe Outstanding New Actor Award in 1958. He was the first African American man to win this award. He was a star long before he met Charles in 1958.
When Charles invited him to be the master of ceremonies during his world tour in 1961, Adams was already a well-known major network radio personality and accomplished actor. 

 

Historically, Black performers had been controlled (and, too often, robbed) by white members of the music industry (agents, managers, accountants, lawyers), whose chief loyalty is to one another and not to their clients.
However, in Adams, Charles discovered a loyal man who was also polished in business and law. He was retired before he decided to join Charles on tour, but subsequently went on to serve as an adviser-manager and their relationship in business was much like a marriage.

 

Adams only could recall one time he had a disagreement with Charles; “We once had a mix-up that had something to do with a song, but I just left it alone and went on to New York and when I returned he told me that I was right,” he told the Sentinel in an exclusive interview.

 

Adams wasn’t just a trusted adviser and manager, but also the designer of all of his wardrobe, producer of shows and photographer. 

 

Their relationship lasted through the singer’s death.

 

Some may scoff at the relationship that Adams and Charles had, but had it not been for Adams the success of the foundation would not be possible. “They needed each other more than anyone could ever imagine,” a confidant said.
Today, Adams looks on as President, Valerie Ervin for whom he and Ray Charles both trained, oversees and is in charge of RPM International, and supervises the many activities of the parent company, including its business holdings and publishing companies, including Tangerine and Racer Music; as well as Ray Charles Enterprises, which covers the activities of the Ray Charles Orchestra and the Raelettes. 

 

Adams was at the helm of the Ray Charles Corporation until his retirement in 2008, he now serves as Chairman of the board appointed by Ray Charles.

 

Although the couple does not have any children, among their gifts was the establishment of the Emma and Joe Adams Public Service Institute at Morehouse College in Atlanta, which supports students who balance academic excellence with a commitment to community service.

 

As major individual donors to The Ray Charles Performing Arts Center, not only have they supported the facility financially with a $500,000 gift, they also are responsible for introducing Ray Charles to Morehouse and nurturing the relationship that yielded the vision for The Ray Charles Performing Arts Center. The facility’s concert hall is named after the couple. The couple has already substantially contributed to building a lasting legacy at Morehouse. 
Adams goes about his dignified life not looking for accolades or personal endorsements, but instead pondering how he can make the lives of those less fortunate better.

 

Asked about his friend Charles, and Adams says; “I miss him,” solemnly.

 

His friend would be proud to know that he is going about life, as he would have with him, all that’s missing is Charles being on tour and producing music.

 

For Adams it’s a void that can never be filled, but there is a mission in life ahead and one that will not be complete without Joe Adams.

 

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

August 29, 2013

 

ARIES

If you seem spaced out this week don’t worry about it. Fill your mind with a vision of love for the entire planet. Use your gifts to assist others in seeing the world as you do, in glorious color. Check the details on paperwork that you have to do, dreamer. Soul Affirmation: Emptiness inside creates the space that I can fill with love. Lucky Numbers: 17, 21, 29

 

TAURUS

 Heavy vibrations could cause you to slow down and think a lot. That’s good, because slowing down is just what you need. Remember to think of the positive. Reject the negative and you’ll have a wonderful week. Soul Affirmation: The slowness of my week gives me time to refresh my energy. Lucky Numbers: 8, 29, 30

 

GEMINI

 Give your busy brain a rest and work your body this week. It’s a great week for physical activity that can loosen up muscles and relieve tensions. Also think about your weight problem if you have one. You’ll receive some practical advice from a distant relative. Soul Affirmation: I let my mind go slack and tighten up my body Lucky Numbers: 23, 29, 40

 

CANCER

Family responsibilities may feel like a chore this week. If you relinquish control of the situation, a natural order will occur, and things will organize themselves. You can let people be who they are. That makes it easier for you to be who you are. Soul Affirmation: I let go and let the spirit run my life this week Lucky Numbers: 41, 54, 55

 

LEO

 Be on the look out for love from a distance source, not just romantic love but the warm glow that comes from someone who cares deeply for you. Think hard about who your lover is. Make a few phone calls. The instant you hear the voice you’ll know –this is the one. Soul Affirmation: Truth is revealed in the smallest grain of sand. Lucky Numbers: 18, 29, 27

 

VIRGO

 Work calls and you’re not completely happy with current divisions of labor. Do your part as a member of the team and you’ll be glad that you did. Others will notice that you are a committed team player. Look for financial rewards from your hard work. Soul Affirmation: Joy is my houseguest this week. Lucky Numbers: 42, 44, 45

 

LIBRA

Business looks good this week as you discover a new way of increasing exposure to your product. Let hope and optimism lead you into new beginnings and fresh starts. All vibes are good, go! Take a good friend with you for help and company on your journey into newness. Soul Affirmation: Make-believe is real while I believe it. Lucky Numbers: 12, 36, 49

 

SCORPIO

 This will be one of those weeks that seem like one you’ve lived before. Good! Make some changes in the way you see things and you’ll make the old new, the routine will become exciting. Communications skill should be excellent. Have some good long talks with relative.  Soul Affirmation: I find happiness by making those around me happy. Lucky Numbers: 26, 34, 52

 

SAGITTARIUS

Travel has been on your mind for some time. Buy the tickets. Fuel the car. New surroundings will bring fresh ways of looking at things, which is exactly what you need. A trip that involves creative expression is called for. Soul Affirmation: I give myself a chance to see how good I can be. Lucky Numbers: 24, 51, 52

 

CAPRICORN

Keep a low voice. Let your presence supply the power, not your words or deeds. Great reward can come from travel with a friend or sweetheart. Remember something that a co-worker has been saying. There is a blessing in it. Soul Affirmation: I let go of all resentment and love my life. Lucky Numbers: 18, 32, 55

 

AQUARIUS

Rev up your engines. This is a fine week for making progress with projects that you’ve got in the works. Your energy is high and your mind is clear. Use every advantage this week to finish up your works. Soul Affirmation: When I feel good about myself, the world feels good to me. Lucky Numbers: 6, 15, 22

 

PISCES

 A spirit of competition may be troubling you. Let it go. Celebrate differences and get on with the work of creating new hope in the world! Your tendency to speak without considering the full impact on others should be checked this week. Soul Affirmation: I seek the lighthearted flavor of love this week. Lucky Numbers: 3, 18, 19

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

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