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Age no opponent for some of NFL’s veteran stars

August 21, 2014

 

Associated Press

  

 

There’s something stunning happening on Michael Vick’s head.

 

You can’t see them from far away, but... Read more...

Stress a key factor in mental health

August 21, 2014

 

By Stacy M. Brown

Special to the NNPA from The Washington Informer

  

Stress wreaks havoc on the mind and body.

 

Until now, it hasn’t been clear... Read more...

Los Angeles schools decriminalize discipline

August 21, 2014

 

By MATT HAMILTON

Associated Press

 

Students caught misbehaving in the nation’s second largest school district will be sent to the principal’s office rather than... Read more...

Aniston, Hamm, Hudson set to Stand Up to Cancer

August 21, 2014

 

Associated Press

 

 

 

Jennifer Aniston, Jon Hamm, Halle Berry, Reese Witherspoon and Kiefer Sutherland want to connect with you about cancer.

 

They... Read more...

Fake deliveryman charged with two home invasions

August 21, 2014

 

City News Service

 

  

A 34-year-old man was charged this week with posing as a deliveryman in two home invasion robberies in Garden Grove this month. Jerry Cleveland... Read more...

August 23, 2012

By MICHELLE FAUL and THOMAS PHAKANE Associated Press 

 

South African President Jacob Zuma on August 22 told striking miners the nation's leaders are mourning with them but he refused their request that he visit the dusty site where police killed 34 strikers and wounded another 78. The killings have caused outrage and eroded support for the party that brought down apartheid and has governed for the nearly two decades.

Zuma came to this mining town northwest of Johannesburg as demands for higher wages spread to at least two other mines, raising fears the instability could inflame protests at more of the South African mines that provide 75 percent of the world's platinum. South Africa's miningweb.com Web site calls it "a possibly ominous development" that could have a "devastating effect on the South African economy" since metals and minerals sales provide such a large part of the country's export income.

"What has happened is very painful. We cry with you, all of us," Zuma told miners in his native Zulu.

There was none of the usual applause or ululating that normally greets Zuma. The hundreds of miners and community members were near sullen.

When Zuma told them he had come to Lonmin PLC mine in Marikana the day after last Thursday's killings, some people shouted "You're lying!"

Zuma had rushed back home from a regional summit in neighboring Mozambique and flown straight to the area, but he visited only with wounded miners. Those who have continued to strike have been angry that he did not come to address them until a week later.

Strike leaders asked Zuma to visit the nearby site of the shootings, but he failed to visit the dusty bush site that miners are sanctifying like the scene of a martyr's death. When the presidential cavalcade left, workers followed its clouds of dust, expecting Zuma to stop at the site where hundreds more miners had gathered. But the convoy just drove past.

Strikers also asked Zuma if the 256 strikers arrested on a range of charges from public violence to murder could be released temporarily from jail to attend memorial services programmed Thursday. Zuma did not respond. And they told their president that they were striking, and would continue to do so, because they want to be paid a monthly minimum wage of R12,500 ($1,560). Zuma did not respond. The current minimum for a mine worker is R5,500 ($690).

Platinum mines, already hit by low world prices and flagging demand, especially from vehicle makers who use the metal to control carbon emissions, may not be in a financial position to seriously consider the demands, some industry analysts say.

The shutdown at London-registered Lonmin PLC mine at Marikana where the Aug. 16 shootings occurred has cost hundreds of millions of dollars in share value. The company said it may have to renegotiate with bankers debt payments that are due on Sept. 30. Lonmin also said it will be unable to meet its annual target production of 750,000 ounces.

Any slowdown in South Africa's platinum production will have little short-term effect internationally, since the platinum industry has allowed the world market to build up a surplus estimated to last between 18 months and two years, according to mining industry specialist Jan de Lange of Sake24.com, an Afrikaans-language business news Web site.

Thandi Modise, premier of North West Province where the platinum mines are located, warned that the protests may spread if authorities don't deal with the massive and growing inequality gap that has many South Africans feeling they have not benefited in the 18 years since black majority rule replaced a racist white minority government. South Africa has become the richest nation in Africa but still has more than 25 percent unemployment — nearer 50 percent among young people. Protests against shortages of housing, electricity and running water and poor education and health services are an almost daily affair.

That poverty is contrasted by the ostentatious lifestyles of a small elite of blacks who have become multimillionaires, often through corruption related to government tenders.

Zuma came to the troubled Lonmin mine a day after striking miners here heckled a committee of government ministers sent to help the grieving community with identification of bodies of slain miners, burial arrangements and bereavement counseling.

"If Jacob Zuma doesn't want to come here, how does he expect to gain our votes?" one man shouted at the Cabinet ministers.

"Don't you know if the miners here don't vote for you, the ANC is going down?" another piped up, referring to the ruling African National Congress party.

Defense Minister Nosiviwe Noluthando Mapisa-Nqakula responded with the first official apology for the police killings.

"As a representative of the government, I apologize," the minister said. "I am begging, I beg and I apologize, may you find forgiveness in your hearts."

South Africa is the world's leading producer of platinum and ferrochrome, the fourth-largest producer of iron ore and is among the top 10 gold producers in the world.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 23, 2012

Associated Press

 

More than 3,000 lots flooded by Hurricane Katrina and bought with federal money in an emergency bailout sit idle across this city — a multimillion-dollar drain on federal, state and city coffers that lends itself to no easy solution.

An Associated Press examination of the properties sold to the government by homeowners abandoning New Orleans after the catastrophic 2005 flood has found that about $86 million has been spent on 5,100 abandoned parcels. And there’s no end in sight to maintenance costs for perhaps most of the 3,100 properties that remain unsold.

This portfolio of urban wasteland and blight represents part of the storm’s difficult legacy that persists nearly seven years later.

And with federal funding for maintenance running out, there’s concern the lots could fall into deeper neglect when this cash-strapped city is forced to pay for upkeep and that they could contribute to New Orleans’s staggering blight. At last count the city found an estimated 43,000 blighted properties, according to a city-sponsored analysis of U.S. Postal Service data.

“Right now nobody on those 3,000-plus properties is contributing. It’s costing the city and state government to maintain them. Police got to go out there, run kids out of there, drug-users,” said Errol Williams, the tax assessor in New Orleans.

Until now, the properties have been managed by the Louisiana Land Trust, an agency set up using federal funds.

Donald Vallee, a longtime New Orleans developer, complained that city officials had not acted fast enough.

He advocated selling the lots at auction. Sitting on the properties, he said, was a “pure waste of money.”

Every month, LLT spends about $88 to cut the grass at each location. Other expenses range from insurance to pest control.

Since 2007, when the first homes were bought, $34 million has been spent on maintenance, $4.5 million on security and $9.1 million on overhead costs in New Orleans, according to LLT. In addition, some $38 million has been spent on demolishing 3,607 homes beyond repair and tearing up 1,256 slabs.

In the Lower 9th Ward, 739 homeowners sold to the state. About 570 of those properties remain unsold and entire blocks sit undeveloped.

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority has said it’s sitting on many properties at the request of neighborhood groups to avoid flooding the market and hurting home prices.

Nicole Heyman, a New Orleans-based expert on vacant and blighted property with the nonprofit Center for Community Progress, said holding onto the property is the right choice. She is advising the city on its plans.

When a city sells cheaply they end up “just putting properties in the hands of investors who drive the properties’ values down,” she said. Buyers often sit on vacant properties hoping for a market turnaround, and when that doesn’t happen the properties end back up in the hands of a city, she said.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 23, 2012

By BRADLEY KLAPPER Associated Press

 

For the first time in its 80-year history, Augusta National Golf Club has female members.

The home of the Masters, under increasing criticism the last decade because of its all-male membership, invited former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore to become the first women in green jackets when the club opens for a new season in October.

Both women accepted.

“This is a joyous occasion,” said Augusta National chairman Billy Payne.

The move likely ends a debate that intensified in 2002 when Martha Burk of the National Council of Women’s Organizations urged the club to include women among its members. Former club chairman Hootie Johnson stood his ground, even at the cost of losing Masters television sponsors for two years, when he famously said Augusta National might one day have a woman in a green jacket, “but not at the point of a bayonet.”

The comment took on a life of its own, becoming either a slogan of the club’s resolve not to give in to public pressure or a sign of its sexism, depending on which side of the debate was interpreting it.

“Oh my God. We won,” Burk said. “It’s about 10 years too late for the boys to come into the 20th century, never mind the 21st century. But it’s a milestone for women in business.”

Payne, who took over as chairman in 2006 when Johnson retired, said consideration for new members is deliberate and private, and that Rice and Moore were not treated differently from other new members. Even so, he took the rare step of announcing two of the latest members to join because of the historical significance.

Tiger Woods, who knows Rice through a mutual connection to Stanford, applauded the move.

“I think the decision by the Augusta National membership is important to golf,” Woods said. “The Club continues to demonstrate its commitment to impacting the game in positive ways. I would like to congratulate both new members, especially my friend Condi Rice.”

A person with knowledge of club operations said Rice and Moore first were considered as members five years ago. That would be four years after the 2003 Masters, when Burk’s protest in a grass lot down the street from the club attracted only about 30 supporters, and one year after Payne became chairman.

Moore and Johnson are close friends, both with roots in South Carolina and banking, and the person said Payne and Johnson agreed on the timing of a female member. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the club typically does not discuss membership issues, said it was important to Payne to be respectful of the membership process.

The person said prospective members often are not aware they are being considered. Augusta National does not say how much it costs to join or provide figures on annual dues.

Augusta National, which opened in December 1932 and did not have a black member until 1990, is believed to have about 300 members. While the club until now had no female members, women were allowed to play the golf course as guests, including on the Sunday before the Masters week began in April.

Most players at the Masters steered clear of the issue when it was raised, citing the private nature of the club. PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem also tried to stay out of it. In some of his strongest comments in May, he said the Masters was “too important” for the tour not to recognize the tournament as an official part of the schedule.

Finchem commended the club on Monday.

“At a time when women represent one of the fastest growing segments in both playing and following the game of golf, this sends a positive and inclusive message for our sport,” Finchem said.

Moore, 58, first rose to prominence in the 1980s with Chemical Bank, where she became the highest-paid woman in the banking industry. She is vice president of Rainwater, Inc., a private investment company founded by her husband, Richard Rainwater, and she was the first woman to be profiled on the cover of Fortune Magazine.

Rice, 57, was the national security adviser under former President George W. Bush and became secretary of state in his second term. The first black woman to be a Stanford provost in 1993, she now is a professor of political economy at Stanford's Graduate School of Business.

“I have visited Augusta National on several occasions and look forward to playing golf, renewing friendships and forming new ones through this very special opportunity,” Rice said in a statement released by the club. “I have long admired the important role Augusta National has played in the traditions and history of golf. I also have an immense respect for the Masters Tournament and its commitment to grow the game of golf, particularly with youth, here in the United States and throughout the world.”

Rice recently was appointed to the U.S. Golf Association’s nominating committee.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 23, 2012

Yussuf J. Simmonds

Co-Managing Editor and

Ashley Nash  LAWT Intern

 

Attorney Benjamin Crump, hired by the family of alleged police brutality victim Ronald Weekley Jr. is demanding that the Los Angeles District Attorney drop the charges against his client, stating that he did nothing wrong to warrant them.

“We not only based that on the video tape, but also the eye witnesses that were present there,” said Crump.

“And, the fact that they (the police) stopped him …they say that he was on the wrong side of the road … but we really think it was more about he was the wrong skin color… and that’s why they assaulted this young man…”

Crump is also representing slain Florida teenager Trayvon Martin, whose murder has been viewed by many across the country as a racist issue.

Weekley Jr., a student at Xavier University in Louisiana, was arrested Saturday, August 18, on the front lawn of his Venice home. Upon returning from breakfast and errands, Weekley said that he was reaching into his front gate (with his skateboard in his hand) when he heard footsteps rapidly ap­proach­ing. Following a loud yell he said, he was grabbed by his hair, shoulders and shirt and immediately thrown to the ground.

“I didn’t know what was going on at first so I was just trying to control my body,” Weekley re­called.

He was completey compliant however, when he realized he was being arrested, he said.  Despite his obedience, Weekley said that the officer to his right, reached over, grabbed his shoulder, took a step back and punched him in the face.

“Right then is when I realized that they didn’t care about my well-being at all,” he told the Sentinel in a recent interview.

Following the blow, he stated that the cop released his hold and he fell to the ground. Subsequently, two officers jumped on top of him. As he explained, “one detained my legs and hands and the other put his knee on the back of my neck, as he continued to punch my face three more times.”

 

It was then that Weekley said he began to cry for help and recognized that the cops were doing something wrong. Holding back tears, Weekley said that the police beat him until he was unconscious. When he finally came to, Weekley was in the back of the police car, asking to speak with family or friends.

“They never told me why I was being arrested,” said the Venice resident who was taken to Los Angeles County Jail’s Twin Towers and read his Miranda Rights.

Later news reports revealed that LAPD officers stopped Weekley Jr. for skateboarding in traffic on Sunset Avenue in Venice, which is a violation there. A spokesman from the department acknowledged that there was a use of force during the arrest and said Weekley was being charged with obstructing and resisting a police officer. The twenty year old science major, was found to have three outstanding warrants.

But Crump is dismissing the seriousness of those warrants, saying the claim is a weak attempt by officers to justify their actions.

“Here’s what those warrants are about,” he explained.

 “He is 20 years old … he’s had a warrant for a curfew violation … at 16, he was riding his bicycle on the sidewalk … and for driving without a license.  Furthermore, they did not stop him for any of those reasons. It’s ridiculous for them to try to offer that up, but that’s what they’re doing so it’s important that we get on the record of what these so-called warrants were for.”

Weekley said he suffered a concussion, broken nose and broken cheekbone. He was not properly treated until an African American officer noticed his injuries, he said. Before that, he was given Vicodin and sent back to his cell.

Weekley Jr. and his father Ronald Weekley Sr. joined Crump at a press conference this week demanding that the officers involved be held accountable.

“Everybody in Venice has told me that they don’t stop anybody for skate boarding in Venice,” Crump said.

 “That’s part of the culture there … that’s what they do all day.  When he was in the car and he asked why did they do this to him, they say because he was a dumb ass, who was skating on the wrong side of the road…”

Weekley was supposed to return to school next week. His court date is in mid September.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Obama gives France $10 million to fight terror in Africa

Obama gives France $10 million to fight terror in Africa

August 21, 2014   By Saeed Shabazz   Special to the NNPA from the New York Amsterdam News       Incensed by the news that President Barack...

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Community

Donating blood saves lives; Sabriya’s Castle of Fun Foundation Annual blood drive is back for the ­community September 27th and sponsored by Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California.

Donating blood saves lives; Sabriya’s Castle of Fun Foundation Annual blood drive is back for the ­community September 27th and sponsored by Ronald McDonald House Charities of Southern California.

August 21, 2014   By Brian W. Carter   LAWT Staff Writer       Blood donation is so important and vital to many lives being saved.  It can...

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Sports News

The dubious Sterling era is officially over – former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is in

The dubious Sterling era is officially over – former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is in

August 14, 2014   Associated Press   Steve Ballmer officially became the new owner of the Los Angeles Clippers on Tuesday August 12.   The team...

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Arts & Culture

Ray Jay faces misdemeanor charges

Ray Jay faces misdemeanor charges

August 21, 2014   City News Service       Entertainer Ray J, who was arrested in May for allegedly groping a woman at a Beverly Hills hotel bar...

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Market Update

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