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EBONY magazine names Mitzi Miller editor-in-chief

April 24, 2014

LAWT News Service

 

Desiree Rogers, CEO of Johnson Publishing Company (JPC), recently named Mitzi Miller as the new editor-in-chief of EBONY magazine, effective immediately.

Miller,... Read more...

L.A. County Sheriffs revise unreasonable force policy

April 17, 2014

City News Service

 

An attorney responsible for monitoring reforms of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said this week that revisions to the definition of unreasonable force... Read more...

Organ Donor Run/Walk set for April 26; 12,000 donor family members, transplant recipients and organ, eye and tissue advocates to participate

April 17, 2014

LAWT News Service

 

Entering its 12th year, the annual Donate Life Run/Walk will celebrate the gift of life through organ, eye, and tissue donation with more than 12,000 people and more... Read more...

Prophet Walker is more than Assembly Candidate; For those who dream he is their internal hope

April 10, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

I’ve heard the whispers of this young man Prophet Walker for some months now, so much so that I took it upon myself to track... Read more...

Elijah Stewart, Julian Richardson lead Boys City Collision XVI roster; View Park’s Top Gun Mareshah Farmer Heads Girl’s City Team

April 03, 2014

LAWT News Services

 

John Wooden Player of the Year and leading City Player of the Year candidate Elijah Stewart and El Camino Real star Julian Richardson will join forces to lead the... Read more...

August 08, 2013

By George E. Curry

NNPA Editor-in-Chief

 

Although Tunisia, Egypt and other troubled hotspots in the region have been shaken by popular uprisings, Morocco has been able to avoid turmoil by expanding the rights of its citizens and giving them more say in their future, Jesse Jackson said in a speech here Tuesday.

In the speech, the longtime civil rights leader praised this northern African country slightly larger than California that borders the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, between Algeria and Western Sahara.

“This region has seen the Arab Spring uprisings all around: Tunisia, Egypt, wars in Libya, and Syria. Many acted with unpreparedness and without defined instructions and a foundation to build a unified, democratic future,” Jackson said in a speech at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation in this capital city.

“Morocco has responded with wisdom and achieved excellent results: it met the Arab Spring uprising by expanding democracy – a new Constitution, a renewed commitment to human rights, a commitment to economic growth and social unification,” Jackson said. “That’s why Morocco today is stable, your democracy is maturing, and you are building institutions to govern your future political, economic and social life.”

Jackson said Morocco, a country of 32.6 million, of whom 99 percent are Muslim, is a “great untold story.”

He explained, “The media often focuses on what’s wrong in the world and threatening conflicts in this region, sometimes deservedly so. Egypt’s uprising and second uprising, wars in Libya, Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. The media covers violence and bloodshed and war every day. But I submit that peaceful, non-violent resolution of conflicts, sustained economic growth – these are the waves of the future that also deserve media coverage.”

Morocco enjoys strong ties to the United States, becoming the first nation to recognize U.S. independence in 1777.

The country describes itself as a constitutional, democratic, parliamentary and a social monarchy. According to news accounts, in response to Arab Spring unrest throughout the region in early 2011, King Mohammed VI introduced a series of changes that included constitutional reforms and early elections.

At various stops during his 5-day visit to Morocco, Jackson described the king as “a young, global-minded and wise leader.”

Despite the establishment of the National Council on Human Rights by King Mohammed VI, more than a dozen human rights activists complained of continued human rights violations in a private meeting Monday with Jesse Jackson.

They alleged the use of police violence to quell peaceful demonstrations, official corruption, lack of transparency, prison abuse, delays in fully implementing the new constitution and failure to assure freedom of expression.

An even larger issue facing Morocco is the longstanding dispute over Western Sahara, with the country claiming about two-thirds of the area as its Southern Provinces and the Algerian-backed Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, which is pushing for an independent state, at war with Morocco over the territory after it was vacated by Spanish colonists and Mauritanian occupiers.

The United Nations brokered a ceasefire in 1991 with the expectation that a referendum would be held to help settle the matter. But the referendum never materialized and the UN is still struggling to negotiate a settlement.

The dispute began more than four decades ago, yet Jesse Jackson remains optimistic.

“When differences and conflicts arise, reasonable people can work it out peacefully, and not fight it out with violence,” Jackson said in his speech. “If Blacks and Whites in South Africa could work it out; if East and West Germany could work it could, then surely Morocco and Algeria can work it out.”

Using examples from the period of slavery through the death of Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old, unarmed Black youth killed by George Zimmerman in Sanford, Fla.,  Jackson talked about the U.S. still struggling to perfect its democracy.

“From those places, today the son of a Kenyan father is now the U.S. president, the single most powerful man in the world, accompanied by 42 African-American members of the U.S. Congress, a member of the U.S. Senate and Supreme Court, and thousands of mayors, state legislators and local elected officials,” Jackson said.

He urged Moroccans not to underestimate the power of one individual to bring about sweeping change, citing the cases of the young Chinese student who risked his life at Tiananmen Square by bravely standing in front of a column of military tanks, Rosa Parks’ decision to challenge segregated seating on a Montgomery, Ala., bus, Dr. Martin Luther King’s lifelong struggle for equality and the self-martyred man in Tunisia who ignited the Arab Spring.

“The value of democracy is appealing and healing – often poetic,” Jackson stated. “It raises a high chin bar for human relationships – between the governor and the governed, and between each other. Its strength lies in its resiliency – it bends but does not break.

“[It’s] the yardstick that challenges traditions of tribe and race, and gender and religion. In a real democracy, everybody is somebody. All are included and none are excluded. A minority of one matters in a democracy.”

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 08, 2013

 

By Freddie Allen

NNPA Washington Correspondent

 

Gun violence is the leading cause of death among Black children and teens, according to a new report by the Children’s Defense Fund, a nonprofit, child advocacy group.

The report titled, “Protect Children, Not Guns 2013,” painted a grim picture of the national gun violence epidemic that is the second-leading cause of death among all children ages 1-19. Only car accidents claim the lives of more children and teenagers than guns.

According to the report, White children were nearly three times more likely to be killed in a car accident than by a gun. In stark contrast, “Black children and teens were twice as likely to be killed by a gun than to be killed in a car accident.” Examining the most recent data available, the CDF study reported that 18,270 children and teens were killed or injured by guns in 2010.

“Children and teens in America are 17 times more likely to die from gun violence than their peers in other high-income countries,” stated the CDF report.

Despite the claims of pro-gun advocates, having a gun in the home does not make kids safer. In some cases, those homes are even more dangerous, because guns are present.

“A gun in the home makes the likelihood of homicide three times higher, suicide three to five times higher, and accidental death four times higher,” stated the report.

The CDF report continued: “More than half of youth who committed suicide with a gun obtained the gun from their home, usually a parent’s gun.”

In the last 50 years, White children and teenagers accounted for 53 percent of the gun deaths, and Black children and teenagers accounted for 36 percent.

Yet, looking at the gun deaths in 2010 alone, 45 percent of gun deaths and 46 percent of gun injuries were among Black children and teens, according to the report, even though they account for only 15 percent of all children and teens living in the United States. Nearly 2,700 children died from gun violence that year.

The CDF report also challenged the perceived power of the National Rifle Association, a group founded in 1871 that promotes gun ownership, marksmanship and self-defense training in the United States. According to the report, the NRA represents a small segment of all gun owners, which may show why the National Rifle Association’s hard-line stance on gun control policies often contradicts that of most gun owners.

The report said that the NRA claims nearly 5 million members, but somewhere between 52 million and 68 million adults living in the United States own the roughly 310 million guns in circulation. That means that the NRA represents less than 10 percent of all adult gun owners in the United States.

In the wake of last December 14 school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. that claimed the lives of 20 first-graders and six school staff, even a majority of NRA members (74 percent) were in favor of expanded background checks, at time when NRA leadership fiercely opposed any bills that would do so.

The report offered a number of solutions to address the gun violence that children and teens face growing up in America, including universal background checks that cover sales on the Internet and at gun shows, limits on assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines, boycotting products that glamorize violence and “supporting non-violent conflict resolution in our homes, schools, congregations and communities.”

Writing in the report, Marian Wright Edelman, founder and president of the Children’s Defense Fund (CDF), implored parents, families, friends, mentors and community stakeholders to pressure Congress to support common sense gun safety and gun violence prevention measures for the nation, including consumer safety standards for all guns, public funding for gun violence prevention research, resources and authority for law enforcement agencies to properly enforce gun laws.

“Parents, remove guns from your home and be vigilant about where your children play. Boycott products that glamorize violence,” wrote Edelman.

Edelman continued: “The overwhelming majority of Americans agree we can and must do better. Polls show the vast majority of Americans, gun owners and non-gun owners, Republicans and Democrats support universal background checks as a first step to making America safer for our children and for all of us. Together we can—and must—do better right now. So many children’s lives depend on it.”

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 08, 2013

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presi­dent Barack Obama will speak later this month at a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington.

 

The White House says the speech will be delivered during the “Let Freedom Ring” ceremony on the Lincoln Memorial steps on Aug. 28. No other details were released.

 

Obama’s speech will come 50 years to the day after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led approximately 250,000 to the National Mall in a march for jobs and freedom. King also delivered his signature “I Have a Dream” speech from the memorial steps.

 

The March on Washington helped pressure Congress to pass the Civil Rights and Voting Rights acts in 1964 and 1965, respectively.

 

The Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act in June. Obama has called that ruling a setback.

 

The “Let Freedom Ring” ceremony is being organized by the King Center in Atlanta. Plans include an interfaith service and ringing of bells at 3 p.m. to mark the time King delivered his speech on Aug. 28, 1963.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 01, 2013

By George E. Curry

NNPA Editor-in-Chief

 

PHILADELPHIA (NNPA) – One of the primary goals of the 1963 March on Washington was finding or creating jobs for Blacks. At a panel discussion during the annual convention of the National Urban League, jobs was mentioned more frequently than any other topic as leaders discussed the famous march 50 years ago and an upcoming one planned for Saturday, Aug. 24.

Barbara Arnwine, president and executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, said employers are increasingly using measures that have nothing to do with job performance that disproportionately limits the ability of African-Americans to gain employment.

“I need you to make sure that your state has a law that says very clearly that you cannot use the fact that somebody has been arrested as a reason not to employ them,” she told convention delegates. “A mere arrest tells you nothing.”

Sounding more like an evangelical preacher than the lawyer that she is, Arnwine drew loud applause when she said, “You need a state law that says to employers that credit checks have nothing to do with your ability to work. If your credit is bad, it’s because you don’t have a job. Get real.”

Al Sharpton, president of the National Action Network, said the private sector needs to assume a larger role in reducing Black unemployment, which stood at 12.7 percent when Obama took office and rose to 13.7 percent in June, twice the White employment rate of 6.6 percent. According to the Depart­ment of Labor Statistics, more than 2.5 million Blacks are unemployed.

“Ever since President Obama has been in, there has been an increase in jobs in the private sector, but Black unemployment has not decreased. Why? Because we work [disproportionately] in the public sector,” he explained. “So while the private corporations who now don’t have to deal with us because the Supreme Court is knocking down affirmative action, they are not hiring us. The public sector is being cut down with agencies and programs – we’re being minimized in the public sector.”

But Sharpton said Blacks have the economic leverage to force companies to hire more African-Americans.

“We need to renegotiate Black America’s understanding – we called them covenants – with the private sector,” he said. “The court can say all it wants about affirmative action, we have the consumer power to say to companies that do business in our communities that, ‘You must have targets of doing jobs in our community.’ They can’t make us buy from those who won’t hire us.”

Jesse Jackson said that all levels of government should also be held accountable.

“In Chicago, there are 81,000 vacant lots,” he stated. “They cut public housing and they foreclosed on private housing. They’ve cut public transportation, cut trauma care. Cut public schools. There is no present plan to bring us out of that isolation. And I think the government has some obligation.”

Especially a government and nation as rich as the U.S., according to Marc Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League.

“We’ve got a $15 trillion economy in the United States of America, the largest economy in the world,” he stated. “And it is unacceptable – Dr. King talked about it and Whitney Young talked about it – for there to be these vast oceans of poverty amid all the plenty. So many are doing well and so many people are left behind.”

He said many U.S. tax and trade policies are misguided.

“American public policy is focused on job creation,” Morial said. A significant part of it is focused on job creation in the wrong places. For example, there’s a huge infrastructure rebuilding program that the people of the United States are paying for. The problem is it’s for the reconstruction of and rebuilding of Bagdad. It’s for the reconstruction of Kandahar…Your and my tax dollars are being invested. That could be and should be redirected to Philadelphia, to Baltimore, to Boston. Secondly, United States trade and tax policies are encouraging job creation. But they are encouraging job creation in China, in India and overseas.”

Closer to home, far away from Iraq and Afghanistan, Rev. Lennox Yearwood, Jr., president and CEO of the Hip Hoop Caucus, said that unlike civil rights veterans, many youth are not eager to participate in marches.

“My generation just doesn’t want to march for marching’s sake,” he said. “We got to march for a reason. Trayvon is one reason. Voting rights is one reason. We much push for policy.”

Proving Yearwood’s point, a young member of the audience gnetly questioned the value of marching.

“I’m concerned about those who are tired of marching who have never marched,” Jackson said. He noted that all demonstrations were undertaken with specific goals in mind and marching is simply a means to an end.

Sharpton agreed.

“You say why march about voting?” he asked, rhetorically. “Well, that’s how we got it the first time. We did not get voting rights at a cocktail sip, trying to have racial harmony sessions. We got it by organizing and galvanizing and the only way we are going to make changes is by organizing and galvanizing.”

Morial said recent changes in federal student loan programs are threatening the existence of some historically Black colleges.

Recalling a recent conversation with Norman Francis, who has been president of Xavier University in New Orleans for 45 years, Morial recounted, “He said that the effect of the changes to the student loan program cost the member colleges of the United Negro College Fund $50 million.”

Morial said he heard similar stories from other HBCU presidents.

“I spoke the other night to the president of Lincoln University [in Pennsylvania]. This was a stunning piece of information. He said, ‘I’m going to lose half of my freshman class. They cannot come back.

“There is something deeply flawed when young people who have gone to high school, graduated from high school, gotten admitted to colleges and universities, successfully completed one year and cannot go back even if they have A’s and top-level scores. They can’t go back because of money.”

Morial said if the Federal Reserve can lend money to banks at zero interest rates, similar accommodations need to be made to save HBCUs.

In response to a question from a convention delegate about whether there should be a national boycott of Florida, Sharpton said he would support a boycott if it were “directed, disciplined and focused.” He said it should be carefully planned, saying, “You got to hurt who has hurt us.”

Jesse Jackson was less nuanced.

“I would make the case that when Stevie Wonder and those artists say let’s boycott Florida, boycott it,” Jackson said to loud applause. “If we can boycott South Africa and bring it down, we can surely boycott Florida and bring it down.”

The death of Trayvon Martin, the 17-year-old African American shot to death by George Zimmer­man, was mentioned throughout the panel discussion as some leaders discussed how best to strike down Stand Your Ground laws, like the one in effect in Florida that imperils the lives of young Black men in particular.

“We are now right back where we were 50 years ago, where states are superseding our federal civil rights,” Sharpton said. “Trayvon Martin had the civil right to go home. State law gave Zimmerman the legal right to say, ‘I can move without any resistance and kill him.’ The federal government must supersede that.”

Jesse Jackson, quoting the first Black Supreme Court justice, added: “As Thurgood Marshall said, the law enslaved us, the law freed us, the law segregated us and now the law is leaving us unprotected.”

(For more information on preserving your voting rights, go to the Election Protection Website, www.866ourvote.org or reach them by telephone, 866-OURVOTE.)

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

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