November 07, 2013

 

ARIES

You feel centered this week and full of efficient energy. Use this week to accomplish tasks, make plans, and finalize arrangements that need to be made. Face into personal responsibilities with love and pleasure now.

 

TAURUS

You can build a bridge with your imagination to reach the person you want to meet. Build the very best bridge your imagination can afford. Your soulmate will then cross over to you. Your intentions are warm and sincere.

 

GEMINI

While those around you may seem disagreeable, mind your own business and don’t take anything personally. Focus your mind on the project you most want to work on this week and put your beautiful energy into that with love.

 

CANCER

A happy week is in store for sociable you. Lots of friends and a party or two or three will keep your energy bright. Use caution while driving and watch for a pleasant surprise or two this week.

 

LEO

Lots of creative energy available this week, and you can use this in many creative ways. Whatever your heart tells you to focus on, focus on that. Maintain emotional balance by taking periodic breaks from your work.

 

VIRGO

Your sense of self is feeling unusually well-defined. And it’s causing you to look confident. People will notice your regal bearing and noble outlook this week.

 

LIBRA

The week may start off cloudy but will soon turn bright if you keep your outlook positive and your thoughts on higher, more optimistic ideas. Be thankful for your wise and generous heart. You have a shining spirit.

 

SCORPIO

Who is your spiritual family? Celebrate your life with these people this week. Offer praise and grace-filled vibrations, and share your blessings. Things on the mundane level are clearing up and working out perfectly.

 

SAGITTARIUS

You've been having these crazy dreams lately, and they're all you can think about Monday. What could they possibly mean? Are they just bizarre and absurd or is there something to them? (And anyway, your normal life has been feeling a bit absurd lately.) People like hearing about your dreams, and Wednesday and Thursday, someone you know might be in the mood to be entertained by one of your wild stories. This weekend, you and your friends have so much fun just sitting around and talking, who needs to spend money

 

CAPRICORN

There's a chance you may need to call on someone for help, but everyone always calls on you for help, so there's no need to feel guilty. There is a lot you want to get done by midweek, and some of it is going to seem impossible. Rest assured, it's not. When you and your best pals put your heads together, there's really not very much you can't do. Persevere and you will prevail. Even this weekend, an unexpected (and positive) outcome is going to prove that the world is aligned in your favor

 

AQUARIUS

You were all gung-ho about your career just a couple days ago, but at the start of the week, you're not so sure. The thing is, you haven't really figured out what you want yet, so it's hard to know if you like what you have. You're in a good place, but could you be in a better place? Hard to say. Midweek, it's worth asking a friend you respect (and who is in love with their career) for some advice. On Friday and over the weekend, plan to spend some time with people who have nothing to do with your professional life whatsoever. Take your mind off things. Have some fun.

 

PISCES

You're happy to help people out on Monday, but you're not exactly thrilled about your suspicion that people are perhaps taking advantage of you. Is that what's happening? Or are you just being over-sensitive? Friends -- they can be so confusing. Just keep your wits about you, and the moment you feel like someone might be taking you for a ride, call them on it, especially Wednesday. (Nothing commands more respect than just being upfront with people.) On Friday or possibly over the weekend, someone you adore is going to ask you for some help, and you're going to be perfectly happy to do whatever they need.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

November 07, 2013

By EURweb.com

Earlier Tuesday, it was being reported that comedian/actor Brandon T. Jackson had been being unfairly treated by a US Airways attendant named “Dee” per his tweets.

Jackson even claimed “Dee” even hurled a racial slur at him during the incident on a flight to Phoenix on Monday. Seemingly it all started when “Dee” allegedly told Jackson to take his seat. From there, the two engaged an argument. Jackson claims “Dee” said to him, “I don’t care if your Obama's son get in your seat!” He also says she called him the n-word.

Jackson, who was continuing on to Los Angeles, was then escorted off the plane and questioned by Phoenix police. He was eventually released but wasn’t allowed to board another (US Airways) flight, he says.

“This was the most racist thing that ever happened to me even the white people on the plane was like that [was] racist,” he tweeted.

OK, that’s Brandon’s side of the story. US Airways says the “Tropic of Thunder” actor was an obnoxious, drunken a-hole during a flight Monday and that’s why he was booted from his plane.

“The disruptive behavior started with loud music being played by Mr. Jackson at his seat,” a rep told TMZ. “He was asked several times to turn down the music.  Additional erratic behavior was observed and that is when the crew made the decision to stop serving [alcohol to Brandon].”

Crew members adamantly deny using the N-word during the inflight altercation with the actor, despite Jackson’s allegations.

US Airways says it stands behind the crew and says they handled the situation appropriately.

As of this posting, Jackson has not responded to US Airways’ comments.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

November 07, 2013

The Pan African Film Festival (PAFF) is ready to take movie goers on a cinematic journey with international film screenings from around the globe with the announcement of its call for submissions.  The 22nd annual PAFF will be held on February 6-17, 2014 in Los Angeles. Over the years, PAFF has showcased films from all parts of the world, representing such countries as Angola, Austria, England, Bermuda, Canada, Egypt, Ethiopia, Brazil, Kenya, Mexico, South Africa, Nigeria, and the United States.

“Over the years, the filmmakers from around the world have become more sophisticated in telling their stories,” says Asantewa Olatunji, the director of programming for PAFF.

This year, PAFF received several awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the African Movie Academy Awards (AMAA) and the first ever Special Achievement Award in the Film Festival Category by African American Film Critics Association (AAFCA) for its contribution to cinematic arts. In February, the festival screened a total of 154 films, representing 34 countries — that is, 23 documentaries, 13 short documentaries, 67 narrative features, and 51 narrative shorts.

Currently, PAFF is accepting submissions of independent features, shorts, narratives and documentary films made by or about people of African descent. Appli­cations are available via the PAFF website at www.paff.org, by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.   or calling (310) 337-4737. Late submissions will be accepted until November 16.  Official selection announcements will be made beginning December 16.

ELIGIBILITY: The PAFF is currently accepting applications for films and videos made by and/or about people of African descent. (Please note: the filmmaker(s) need not be of African or African American descent.) Films should preferably depict positive and realistic images and can be of any genre — drama, comedy, horror, adventure, animation, romance, science fiction, experimental, etc. PAFF accepts features and shorts both narrative and documentary. The film festival will accept submissions of works in progress; however, the final version  of the film must be completed no later than January 2, 2014.

COMPETITION: The PAFF competition categories are: Best Narrative Feature, Best Narrative Short, Best Documentary, Best Director — First Feature, plus, Audience Favorite Awards  for Narrative Feature and Favorite Documentary. Films in competition must be copyrighted no earlier than 2013. With the exception of Audience Favorite Awards, all films are judged by industry professionals, selected by PAFF. In addition to competition awards, other programming and festival special prizes will be awarded.

SUBMISSION: For information about the festival, submission procedures, fees and registration, visit www.paff.org or call 310. 337-4737. Late submissions will be accepted until November 16, 2013.  Official selection announcements will be made beginning December 16, 2013.

For more information visit www.paff.org or call (310) 337-4737.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

November 07, 2013

By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY

Associated Press

 

Motown founder Berry Gordy recalls that when he first signed The Jackson 5, he sent them to live in a house in California — and the rowdy kids ended up getting kicked out and had to move in with him.

Joked Gordy: “Be careful what you wish for.”

On Monday, Marlon Jackson thanked Gordy for “letting us come to your house and tear it up,” as well as for putting them on the path to a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame career in a tribute to Gordy at the Ebony Power 100 gala.

“Michael and his brothers were just incredible to be around,” he said of the group, fronted by the late Michael Jackson. “I’m happy they’re here.”

Gordy danced along with the rest of the crowd as the Jacksons — Marlon, Jermaine, Jackie and Tito — performed hits such as “Shake Your Body Down to the Ground” and “I Want You Back.”

Gordy received a lifetime achievement award at the event, which honored blacks who are wielding considerable power, such as President Barack Obama, Forest Whitaker, commentator Van Jones, educator Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Serena Williams.

Among those in attendance were Magic Johnson, Victor Cruz, Lala Vasquez and Condola Rashad. Nick Cannon was the host of the ceremony, which also featured a performance from the actors from “Motown: The Musical.”

Gordy, whose Motown Records not only changed music history but also America's culture with its sound and image, recalled that the first major cover the label got for its artists was Ebony magazine.

“It was the Supremes. They had no idea how much it meant to us,” said Gordy, who took a copy of the cover out of his pocket to show the audience.

Gordy said Ebony magazine, which has chronicled black culture for decades, was integral to his success.

“I feel like I’ve come full circle because I’m back here at Ebony again,” Gordy said. “I really feel like I should be giving them an award because they were so important to giving us the confidence.”

Besides the musical tribute, the Jacksons gave Gordy a plaque of platinum records marking the millions of records they sold as part of Motown Records.

Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

November 07, 2013

By Zenitha Prince

Special to the NNPA from the Afro-American Newspaper

 

Hollywood continues to be a bastion of homogeneity where people of color are underrepresented, according to a new study from the University of Southern California at Annenberg.

Professor Stacy L. Smith and her team analyzed 500 top U.S. box office films released in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 for the racial and ethnic representation both behind the camera and in more than 20,000 speaking roles.

They found that in 2012, only 10.8 percent of speaking characters were Black, 4.2 percent were Hispanic, 5 percent were Asian, and 3.6 from other (or mixed race) ethnicities. Comparatively, over three-quarters of all speaking characters were White (76.3 percent).

Broken down per film, the analysis found that in nearly 40 percent of all movies released in 2012, Black characters comprise less than 5 percent of the speaking cast, while only 9 percent of movies met national demographic trends and had Black actors comprising 12 to 14.9 percent of the cast.

“There is still a noticeable lack of diversity across the landscape of popular films,” Smith, the principal investigator, said in a statement. “This year is the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights movement, and the Census shows that the population of the United States is more diverse than ever. Our film content, however, depicts something very different.”

The scarcity of Black faces occurs not only on the screen, but also in the director’s chair, the report found. Among a total of 565 directors and 500 top-grossing films from 2007 to 2012, only 33 (5.8 percent) films had directors who were Black. Accounting for multiple films directed by the same person, only 22 unique Black directors helmed top-grossing films in the last five years, and only two of those directors are female.

“It is hard to believe that across all of these top directing jobs, there are only two qualified Black females. Other talented Black female directors exist. Where are they?” Smith said.

The absence of directors of color influences the number of minority actors getting jobs, as minority directors are more likely to hire actors of color, the report found. For example, among films that had a Black director, 52.6 percent of that movie’s speaking characters were Black, compared to just 9.9 percent for films with non-Black directors, the study found.

“Quite simply, when we see diversity behind the camera, we see a difference in the percentage of diverse characters on screen,” said Marc Choueiti, a co-author of the study. “The question is: are these directors encouraged to create more diverse stories that reflect the world? Or is the type of story they are entrusted with an exclusive story about their own racial or ethnic group?”

To view the report, visit annenberg.usc.edu

 

PHOTO:  ENT-Hollywood-SCROLL.jpg

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Parent Category: Lifestyle
Category: Arts & Culture

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