November 29, 2012

By KYLE HIGHTOWER  Associated Press

 

A study of the racial and gender makeup of leadership and coaching positions among the Football Bowl Subdivision membership showed it remains largely white and male.

The report recently released by the Institute for the Diversity and Ethics in Sport at the University of Central Florida said that 100 percent of FBS conference commissioners, 76 percent of school president positions and 84 percent of all athletic director positions were held by white men at the beginning of the 2012-13 academic year.

It also showed a decline in the percentage of women in campus leadership positions with a slight increase in the representation of people of color, especially for Latinos and Asians.

Among the FBS’ 120 institutions, there were 18 minority head coaches to begin the season, down from an all-time high of 19 last year. That total included 14 African-Americans, two Latinos and two Asians.

“For me as somebody who has worked on college campuses for 30-plus years it’s especially discouraging that in terms of hiring practices they are far behind the professional levels,” said primary study author Richard Lapchick. “I would have hoped that colleges would have at least kept pace, but they are clearly behind in hiring practices.”

For the position of faculty athletics representative, 94.4 percent are white and 31.7 percent are women.

According to 2011 data compiled by the Chronicle of Higher Education, 6.3 percent of full-time faculty members are Asian, which is 1.2 percentage points less than the 2007 data reported in last year’s study. African-American and Latino faculty members have grown by 1.6 and 0.6 percentage points respectively, to seven and 4.2 percent. Forty-seven percent are women.

For coaches, the study’s numbers don't reflect the recent dismissals of Joker Phillips at Kentucky, and Jon Embree from the University of Colorado, who drew attention to the poor rehire rate for minority coaches.

During his final news conference earlier this week, Embree hinted at a double standard for African-American hires after they are fired from a head coaching job.

Tyrone Willingham is the only African-American coach to be hired for another head coaching job (by Washington in 2005) after having been fired (by Notre Dame in 2004).

“We don’t get second chances,” Embree said. “And that’s OK, you know it going into it ... But every minority coach knows that going into it. Eventually that'll change.”

The numbers show that change is coming at a slow pace.

Since 1982, there have been 546 head coaches hired in the FBS and 41 African-Americans since Willie Jeffries became the first at Wichita State in 1979. There have also been three Latino and two Asian/Pacific Islander head coaches hired in FBS history.

“Our representation is not consistent on the court or on the playing fields,” Black Coaches and Admini­strators executive director Floyd Keith said. “You have to look at the numbers.”

Keith noted that a pair of other African-American coaches have been fired from FBS jobs and rehired, though not on the FBS level.

“Turner Gill was fired at Kansas but ended up at (Football Champion­ship Subdivision) Liberty. We had Tony Samuel at New Mexico State and he ended up at Southeast Missouri State. With only 41 individuals hired in history, it’s not a very good record,” he said. “You have to say getting back in the cycle is difficult. So you have to make the most of your first chance.”

Keith also echoed the importance of getting more diversity at the leadership positions.

“I think in total it’s about college athletics,” he said. “When you’re making decisions, there was the old term ‘Out of sight, out of mind.’ If you aren’t represented around the table, your concerns aren’t heard. And that’s at all levels.”

Both Keith and Lapchick continue to advocate for an “Eddie Robinson Rule,” which like the NFL’s Rooney Rule, would mandate that minorities are included in the interview process for open head coaching and key front office positions.

Since the BCA started putting out its hiring report cards in 2004, the number of minority coaches in the FBS increased 600 percent from three to last year’s high of 19.

BCA partners with Lapchick to put out the report cards and said that in the latest one, which is scheduled to be released this week, three schools that hired black coaches received poor grades because they didn’t invite more minority candidates to the interview process.

“If they continue to be excluded from that interview room, not much is going to change,” Lapchick said.

Keith said the process of bringing a Robinson Rule to college athletics continues to be a slow process.

“We’ve had meetings, and I don’t think anything has ever seriously developed out of it ... they simply have been discussions,” he said. “We keep talking about it. We see minor advances in terms of overall landscape, but there’s hasn't been a watershed change.”

He said his resolve to see it happen won’t be affected by the pace, though.

“Perseverance. We’ve got to keep being advocates,” Keith said. “We have to continue it and keep it going.” 

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Category: Sports

November 22, 2012

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the NBA’s leading scorer, was the center of attention this past Friday night outside of Staples Center as his statue was unveiled.  Earving “Magic” Johnson, Jerry West, James Worth, Pat Riley, and several hundred fans were all on hand to honor Jabbar, who led the Lakers to five NBA championships.

 Photo by Ken Brooks

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November 22, 2012

The legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (center) was roasted in a celebrity roast hosted by George Lopez on Saturday, November 17 at LA Live. The roast benefited the Skyhook Foundation and was attended by a who's who of celebrities including legendary basketball friends, Dr. J. Julius Irving, Magic Johnson, Bill Watson, Norm Nixon, Kurt Rambis. Jamaal Wilkes and AC Green. Here, Kareem ends the night with a group shot of some of those who spent time on stage roasting the icon for a sold-out crowd. For more information go to www.kareemabduljabbar.com.

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November 22, 2012

Sentinel News Service

 

Councilmembers Bernard C. Parks and Jan Perry declared November 14, 2012 Dwight Howard Day in the city of Los Angeles.  Parks and Perry hosted a special event at City Hall where they presented Dwight Howard an official 6' 10" city resolution (Dwight's height) with the help of surprise guest, Snoop Lion (formerly Snoop Dogg). The Cren­shaw Choir sang and city staff members looked on as Parks and Perry welcomed Howard to the city of Los Angeles.

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November 22, 2012

Associated Press

 

Memphis Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph has been fined $25,000 by the NBA for confronting Oklahoma City's Kendrick Perkins following both their ejections in a game last week.

The fine was announced Monday by Stu Jackson, the league’s executive vice president of basketball operations.

Randolph and Perkins were each ejected for an altercation with 2:05 remaining in the fourth quarter of Memphis’ 107-97 win in Oklahoma City on November 14. Perkins and Randolph confronted each other between Russell Westbrook’s free throw attempts and were both tossed.

The two tried to approach each other while being restrained by teammates before finally heading out tunnels at opposite ends of Chesapeake Energy Arena. Randolph then talked to Perkins near the locker room, drawing the fine.

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