June 14, 2012

Crystal Barnes, formerly Director of Industry Relations, was named Vice President of Industry Relations for Nielsen, a leading global provider of information and insights, effective immediately. In her role, Barnes is responsible for expanding the reach of Nielsen’s thought leadership efforts across the media and consumer industries, focusing on the increasingly diverse and connected consumer.

 

Barnes began at Nielsen in 2004 as part of the company’s Emerging Leaders Program (ELP). As an Emerging Leader Associate, she was exposed to various industries and expertise across the company. Upon completion of the program, Barnes worked in public affairs and was instrumental in the expansion of Nielsen’s multicultural outreach efforts, strengthening the company’s communications and public affairs program.

 

Since her appointment to the industry relations position, she has developed and managed strategic alliances with industry and business associations within the global business community. Barnes applies significant strategic and tactical skills to expand and transform the company's position in the industry, both with traditional and new associations in the digital space.

 

Prior to joining Nielsen, Barnes held production and communications positions at WHP, a CBS affiliate in Harrisburg, Penn. and Comcast SportsNet in Bethesda, MD. A native of Pennsylvania, she received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Broadcast Tele­com­munications and Mass Media from Temple University.

 

 

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

June 14, 2012

By PETE YOST |

Associated Press

 

WASHINGTON (AP)   A House committee looking into a flawed gun-smuggling probe in Arizona announced Monday that it will consider holding Attorney General Eric Holder in contempt of Congress next week for failing to produce some documents the panel is seeking.

The committee has scheduled a contempt vote for June 20.

To date, the Justice Depart­ment has produced 7,600 pages of material to the committee.

Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, says Congress needs to examine records regarding the Justice Department's conduct following public disclosures in early 2011 that hundreds of guns illicitly purchased at gun shops on the U.S. side of the border wound up in Mexico, many of them at crime scenes.

The Justice Department says many of the documents being sought deal with open criminal investigations and prosecutions   matters relating to sensitive law enforcement activities that cannot be disclosed.

“The Justice Department is out of excuses,” House Speaker John Boehner said Monday. “Congress has given Attorney General Holder more than enough time to fully cooperate with its investigation into Fast and Furious,” the name of the flawed law enforcement operation.

Issa said Congress has an obligation “to investigate unanswered questions about attempts to smear whistleblowers, failures by Justice Department officials to be truthful and candid with the congressional investigation and the reasons for the significant delay in acknowledging reckless conduct in Operation Fast and Furious.”

Justice Department spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler said that “from the beginning, Chairman Issa has distorted the facts, ignored testimony and flung inaccurate accusations at the attorney general and others, and this latest move fits within that tired political playbook that has so many Americans disillusioned with Washington.”

In a letter to Issa, Deputy Attorney General James Cole said the move toward a contempt vote was premature because there have been productive staff discussions in two meetings over the past few weeks.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said the attorney general has appeared eight times on Capitol Hill where he has undergone questioning about the problems in Fast and Furious.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, whose investigation first turned up problems in Operation Fast and Furious, said the action by the House committee “is straightforward and necessary. Contempt is the only tool Congress has to enforce a subpoena.”

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

 June 07, 2012

 

By JACK ELLIOTT JR. | Associated Press

 

 

 

PARCHMAN, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi man convicted of killing four young nieces and nephews in a 1990 stabbing rampage was executed Tuesday, despite pleas from his two sisters to spare the brother who killed their children.

 

Henry “Curtis” Jackson Jr. was pronounced dead at 6:13 p.m. CDT Tuesday after receiving an injection at the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman, officials said.

 

Clad in a red prison jumpsuit as he lay strapped to a gurney, Jackson was asked if he wanted to make a statement.

 

“No, I don’t,” he responded as family members sat somberly in a nearby witness room.

 

Jackson’s sister, Glenda Kuyoro, stifled a sob when she walked into the witness room earlier and saw her brother on the gurney. Jackson’s eyes were closed when the witnesses arrived and he never looked in the direction of his family.

 

Earlier, the 47-year-old inmate had spent the day receiving relatives, including one of the sisters whose two children were slain and who survived the stabbing attack. The slain children ranged from 2 to 5 and were killed as Jackson reportedly was trying to steal his mother’s safe while she was away at church, court records showed.

 

Late Tuesday afternoon, Repub­lican Gov. Phil Bryant declined to stop the execution though he said he was “deeply touched” by requests for clemency from the sisters and his brother-in-law.

 

“There is no question that Mr. Jackson committed these heinous crimes, and there is no clear and convincing evidence that compels me to grant clemency,” Bryant said.

 

His statement added: “One of these sisters was a stabbing victim, and both of the sisters are mothers of the murdered children. However, as governor, I have the duty to see that justice is carried out.”

 

Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said at a penitentiary briefing earlier Tuesday that the inmate acknowledged the crime and was talkative as he received relatives. Visitors included his sister Regina Jackson, who was stabbed five times and survived the attack that killed her two daughters and two nephews.

 

Regina Jackson had met with the governor Monday and pleaded for her brother’s life. She also wrote Bryant a letter last month saying she “just can’t take any more killing.”

 

“As a mother who lost two babies, all I’m asking is that you not make me go through the killing of my brother,” she wrote.

 

Kuyoro and her husband, Andrew, also had asked Bryant to spare the inmate in a letter dated May 15.

 

“We are the victims in this case, and we are begging you not to let Curtis be killed. You can keep him in Parchman forever, but please don’t put our family through this horrible execution,” the Kuyoros had written earlier.

 

The attack took place Nov. 1, 1990, at Jackson’s mother’s home in the Delta region.

 

The mother was at church that day, and Regina Jackson was there with her two daughters and four nieces and nephews. Her two daughters and two nephews were stabbed to death, records showed. Another niece was so severely injured that she was a paraplegic until her recent death.

 

Jackson has said he doesn’t remember stabbing the children, but there was testimony at his September 1991 trial that he cut the phone line before going in the house, then demanded money and began the attack, according to the court record.

 

Regina Jackson testified at trial that she lapsed in and out of consciousness after being tied up and stabbed in the neck, but she could hear her brother dragging a safe down a hall. The noise awoke 5-year-old Dominique, one of her daughters.

 

“Regina testified that Jackson called Dominique to him, told her that he loved her, stabbed her and tossed her body to the floor,” according to the court record. “Jackson returned to Regina, stabbing her in the neck and twisting the knife, at which point she pretended to be dead until she heard him leave.”

 

Jackson subsequently surrendered to police. He was convicted of four counts of capital murder at trial and sentenced to death.

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

June 07, 2012

By SARAH BRUMFIELD | Associated Press

 

BALTIMORE (AP) — A victim left partially blinded by a baseball bat attack at a Maryland university now believes a cannibalism suspect in another case may have been planning to eat his organs, too, his attorney said Tuesday.

When 22-year-old Joshua Ceasar regained consciousness after the attack last month at a Morgan State University dormitory apartment, he saw Alex Kinyua standing over him with a knife, said attorney Steve Silverman. Days later, Kinyua told investigators that he had eaten the heart and brain of a family friend he is charged with killing at his family’s home in Joppatowne, according to charging documents.

“In hindsight, knowing what transpired only days later, Josh is convinced that Alex was going to cut open his body and likely consume his organs,” Silverman said. What may have prevented it was two other apartment residents followed a blood trail from the front door and stopped Kinyua before he could use the knife and he fled into nearby woods.

Campus police charged Kinyua with assault and reckless endangerment in the bat attack. Prosecutors asked a court commissioner to refuse bail, but he was freed on $220,000 bail, according to the State’s Attorney’s office. Ceasar said Kinyua randomly attacked him, according to a probable cause statement obtained from Baltimore police. Witnesses told police that Kinyua attacked Ceasar with a bat, but the statement does not mention witnesses interrupting a knife attack in a back room.

Kinyua’s attorney could not be reached for comment.

Kinyua was waiting with a bat wrapped in barbed wire and chains when an unsuspecting Ceasar walked through the front door of the apartment Kinyua had been sharing with Ceasar’s friends on May 19, Silverman said. Ceasar was visiting campus for another friend’s graduation. He lost consciousness when Kinyua cracked him on the head, fracturing his skull and shattering his left eye socket. Ceasar is blind in that eye and doctors aren’t optimistic that he will regain his sight, Silverman said.

Kinyua, 21, a U.S. citizen originally from Kenya and a Morgan student, admitted using a knife to kill and carve up 37-year-old Kujoe Bonsafo Agyei-Kodie before eating his organs, the Harford County Sheriff's Office said when they arrested him May 30. The older man, a native of Ghana, had been staying with the Kinyua family for about six weeks at their townhouse in the Baltimore suburb of Joppatowne and disappeared May 25. His body was found four days later; investigators haven’t given a possible motive.

Silverman said he is investigating if there were earlier signs that Kinyua was a danger.

“We are in the process of ... determining whether or not university officials should have or could have done anything in light of what was known to them to protect students, family and friends on campus for graduation,” he said. “It appears preliminarily there were a number of indicators.”

A December campus police report obtained by The Baltimore Sun states that Kinyua was kicked out of an ROTC program after he punched holes in the walls of the cadet computer lab and a military instructor referred to him as a “Virginia Tech waiting to happen.” The report said Kinyua was barred from campus until a meeting with school officials and that two officers didn’t think a psychological ­evaluation was needed.

The university is reviewing whether officials could have responded in a different way, said Morgan spokesman Clinton Coleman.

“At this point we believe the university did everything it should have,” he said. “You always have to bear in mind that you are dealing with student issues and young people and you have to deal with each person individually.”

Agyei-Kodie’s sister, Irene Konadu Asante, said the family would discuss the possibility of taking legal action on Thursday, following tradition in Ghana of waiting a week after a death before holding a family meeting.

She said the funeral would be held in Ghana, “whatever it takes,” but arrangements had not yet been made. When asked how her family is reacting to the horrific way in which her brother was killed, she said it is not easy.

“It’s not only my family — the way it hit the whole world,” Asante said. “It’s more than you can imagine.”

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

June 07, 2012

By BRIAN WITTE |

Associated Press

 

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — About 200 people honored the first Black graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy at a memorial service Wednesday, recalling a man of courage who helped open doors for generations of minorities decades before the civil rights era.

Retired Lt. Cmdr. Wesley Brown, who died last month at 85, was memorialized as a trailblazer who shrugged off poor treatment by classmates to become the first Black to graduate from the military academy in 1949. His ashes were interred before the service in a columbarium on the academy grounds.

NASA’s first Black administrator, astronaut Maj. Gen. Charles Bolden, was among those lauding Brown’s achievement.

“I stand before all of you today as a proud child of Lt. Cmdr. Wesley Brown’s sacrifice,” Bolden told those attending the memorial in the academy's chapel.

Bolden, who graduated from the academy 15 years after Brown, said he knew no one who would claim to have a tougher first year at the school than Brown.

“While I had my own difficulties gaining admission to the academy in 1964, Wesley Brown’s 1949 graduation and the legacy he left behind helped paved the way for me and so many others,” Bolden said.

The number of minority students at the academy has increased significantly over the years. The graduating class of 2012, for example, had 277 minority students out of 1,099.

Those gathered recalled a friendly and persistent man who endured poor treatment by classmates with resilience and grace, well before the dawning of the civil rights’ struggle against racial discrimination.

Brown lived alone at the academy during his four years so he wouldn’t have to burden roommates with residing with the school’s only Black student, said Kerwin Miller, a 1975 academy graduate who spoke at the service.

“What he did for us is so much greater than what we could do for him,” said Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations. “He showed us that one person can make a difference.”

Brown was the sixth African-American student to enter the academy and the first to graduate. He ranked 370th out of nearly 800 midshipmen in his class.

Janie Mines, who graduated in 1980, described Brown as an inspiring person who continued to take a keen interest in the academy throughout his life. “He was a constant figure who did so much to contribute to our well-being,” Mines said of the Baltimore native.

Brown’s son, Wesley Brown Jr., played “Amazing Grace” at the service before a school portrait of his father set up on an easel.

Brown’s family is donating to the academy his class ring and his Reef Points book, which was issued to him when he entered the academy in 1945.  Reef Points is the official handbook for midshipmen, outlining basic information and the academy’s mission and history.

At the academy, Brown ran varsity track and cross country and was a cross-country teammate of former President Jimmy Carter — also a midshipman in that era.

Brown went on to a 20-year career with the Navy. He helped build houses in Hawaii, roads in Liberia, facilities in the Philippines and a seawater conversion plant in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

In 2008, the Naval Academy built the Wesley Brown Field House to accommodate physical education classes as well as the academy’s athletic programs.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

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