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EBONY magazine names Mitzi Miller editor-in-chief

April 24, 2014

LAWT News Service

 

Desiree Rogers, CEO of Johnson Publishing Company (JPC), recently named Mitzi Miller as the new editor-in-chief of EBONY magazine, effective immediately.

Miller,... Read more...

L.A. County Sheriffs revise unreasonable force policy

April 17, 2014

City News Service

 

An attorney responsible for monitoring reforms of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department said this week that revisions to the definition of unreasonable force... Read more...

Organ Donor Run/Walk set for April 26; 12,000 donor family members, transplant recipients and organ, eye and tissue advocates to participate

April 17, 2014

LAWT News Service

 

Entering its 12th year, the annual Donate Life Run/Walk will celebrate the gift of life through organ, eye, and tissue donation with more than 12,000 people and more... Read more...

Prophet Walker is more than Assembly Candidate; For those who dream he is their internal hope

April 10, 2014

By Kenneth D. Miller

Assistant Managing Editor

 

I’ve heard the whispers of this young man Prophet Walker for some months now, so much so that I took it upon myself to track... Read more...

Elijah Stewart, Julian Richardson lead Boys City Collision XVI roster; View Park’s Top Gun Mareshah Farmer Heads Girl’s City Team

April 03, 2014

LAWT News Services

 

John Wooden Player of the Year and leading City Player of the Year candidate Elijah Stewart and El Camino Real star Julian Richardson will join forces to lead the... Read more...

August 22, 2013

 

By Charlene Muhammad

LAWT Contributing Writer

 

It’s been more than a month since a jury acquitted George Zimmerman of killing Sybrina Fulton’s son, 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.  The Florida teen’s smile captured the world.  It glistened as the future and promise of millions of young Black men across America.  But in addition to his death on February 26, 2012, after Zimmerman profiled, followed, and shot him at point blank range, the not-guilty verdict shattered the hearts of everyone endeared to him by photos that graced newspapers and TV sets alike.  His killing has also revealed the strength and courage of Sybrina Fulton, who says before the tragedy, she was just a regular woman, with a regular job, a regular car, and regular children.  In an interview with award-winning journalist Sister Charlene Muhammad in Phoenix, Arizona on August 18, Fulton talked about her life after the verdict, the faith that carries her, and she encouraged other mothers fighting similar battles for justice.

Sister Charlene Muhammad (SCM):  Thank you for taking time to speak with me.  As we see you on the move, traveling across the country to raise awareness about the Trayvon Martin Foundation, how do you also pass your days when the lights, the cameras, the people are not there? What gives you comfort after something of this magnitude when you're alone?

Sybrina Fulton (SF):  I just like spending time with my family and my friends, who are very positive.  And they kind of uplift me.  They kind of help me pray my way through this.  When the cameras are off, when I'm not doing interviews, when I'm not traveling, I spend a lot of time with my family and friends.

SCM:  What role do you see Black media playing in terms of the Trayvon Martin Amendment and this level of the justice movement for your son?

SF:  They can make sure that they're doing productive stories, that they are listening to what we're saying and not just taking the negative away from what we're saying, but also taking the positive away.  Usually we have action items like signing the petition, which is going on our website and just supporting the Trayvon Martin Foundation, and, making sure that they vote.

SCM: Were there ever moments during the trial when you just wanted to, scream out in the courtroom, and if so, when?

SF:  Yes. There was a time but there was a room that we go into. And I would call it the meditation room because that was the room where we could have quiet time.  That's the room where we could listen to music.  We could pray.  We could just close our eyes and get away from the environment. I was saying it was a bit much to be in the courtroom, listening to all the evidence, listening to the medical examiner's report, just physical pictures that we saw, it was just troublesome.  It was good that we had the opportunity to get away and take a time out from the trial.

SCM:  As you’re certainly aware, people, and not just youth, took to the streets after the verdict.  In Los Angeles, in the Leimert Park area, they responded right away.  Later some broke into rioting.  What do you think about the people's response, especially the young men who, as a brother said during the panels, are just afraid and wanting to know where to go from here?

SF:  I think they should have a concern.  I'm not opposed to someone protesting, marching, attending rallies as long as it's peaceful because that's what we have been demonstrating, you know, peaceful protests, peaceful rallies and things like that.  I don't have issues with that.  Just keep in mind that for it to be productive it needs to be peaceful.  The other thing is they were just speaking out to express themselves and how they felt about the verdict.  They weren't satisfied.  They were very disappointed and they were very saddened by the verdict, so of course they're going to do things.  They're going to attend rallies and they're going to show up in numbers because they were upset.

SCM:  Any message for the mothers out there, some already walking in your shoes and some, God forbid, whom we've yet to know as this brutality continues?

SF:  I would just tell them to be encouraged, to connect themselves with something positive, connect themselves with some faith based organization.  I would tell them to make sure they surround themselves with their family and friends.  That's what's going to help them.  Don't go in a shell. Don't be away from people because that's how depression sets in.  I would just tell them as much as possible to talk it out.  Find somebody they feel comfortable with talking to and tell that person how they're feeling because only when you tell somebody how you're feeling, and you get those feelings out, it's not festering within.

SCM:  You’ve spoken about having a regular life as regular person. How has this ordeal changed you?

SF:  I this this ordeal changed me.  I felt like I had a purpose in life already. I worked for the housing agency in Miami so I felt like I was doing something purposeful by helping residents that were public housing and Section 8 participants so I felt like I was doing something meaningful.  This has taken it to another level.  Now, I'm reaching a much more broader community and more broader aspect of people.  I think it's a purpose to everything.

SCM:  Thank you again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 15, 2013

By Freddie Allen

NNPA Washington Correspondent

 

In a stunning turn in criminal justice policy, Attorney General Eric Holder announced steps the Justice Department will take to address over population in federal prisons by changing mandatory minimum sentencing guidelines and pushing non-violent drug offenders into rehab programs instead of prison cells.

In a speech Monday August 12 at an annual meeting of the American Bar Association in San Francisco, Holder said, “Today, a vicious cycle of poverty, criminality, and incarceration traps too many Americans and weakens too many communities. However, many aspects of our criminal justice system may actually exacerbate this problem, rather than alleviate it.”

Holder also acknowledged, that “too many Americans go to too many prisons for far too long, and for no good law enforcement reason.”

Nearly 219,000 Americans are locked up in federal prisons. Even though, Blacks account for 13.1 percent of the United States population, Blacks take up 37 percent of the beds in federal prisons, according to Federal Bureau of Prisons. Roughly 47 percent of prisoners are locked up for drug offenses, many of them non-violent offenders. According to the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the Department of Justice spent $6.6 billion housing federal prisoners in 2012.

Holder said that the Justice Department’s plans would mirror policies that worked to reduce prison populations and recidivism in Kentucky, Texas, Georgia, North Carolina. Ohio and other states. According to Holder, at least 17 states have improved recidivism rates and decreased prison populations without compromising public safety by shifting resources “from prison construction and toward evidence-based programs and services, like treatment and supervision, that are designed to reduce recidivism.”

Holder noted that while the federal prison population continues to increase, in 2012 state prison populations experienced the largest drop in a single year.

“The bottom line is that, while the aggressive enforcement of federal criminal statutes remains necessary, we cannot simply prosecute or incarcerate our way to becoming a safer nation,” said Holder.  “To be effective, federal efforts must also focus on prevention and reentry.”

Holder also announced increas­ed funding for the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) that provides federal funding for advanced training and jobs for local law enforcement. Holder said that a new round of COPS grants would provide more than $110 million to hire military veterans and school resource officers.

The Obama administration placed more than $1.5 billion into the COPS program over the past four years, even as critics panned it and research that found it often contributed to over-policing in poor and minority communities and played only a limited role in the reduction of crime.

Still, members of Congress praised Holder’s announcement. In a press release, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) said that she will introduce legislation that will “curb federal prosecutions of low-level and non-violent drug offenders; re-focus scarce federal resources to prosecute major drug kingpins, and give courts and judges greater discretion to place drug users on probation or suspend the sentence entirely.”

In a separate statement, Con­gressional Black Caucus Chair Marcia L. Fudge (D-Ohio) said that, “It is well documented that a disproportionate share of stiff mandatory sentences for low-level, non-violent crimes typically impact low income populations and communities of color.”

Fudge continued: “The measures introduced by the Attorney General will provide a fair and balanced approach to sentencing while improving protection of our nation’s vulnerable communities.”

The Justice Department’s “Smart on Crime” initiative will focus five key provisions:

• Prioritizing prosecutions to focus on the most serious cases

• Reforming sentencing to eliminate unfair disparities and reduce overcrowded prisons.

• Pursuing alternatives to incarceration and low-level, non-violent crimes.

• Improving reentry to curb repeat offenses and re-victimization.

• Surging resources to violence prevention and protecting the most vulnerable populations.

“We must never stop being tough on crime,” said Holder. “But we must also be smarter on crime.”

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 15, 2013

By Geoff Mulvill and Angela Delli Santi

Associated Press

 

Cory Booker brushed off three experienced opponents in a victory in New Jersey’s special Democratic U.S. Senate primary, setting up a campaign of deep contrasts with Steve Lonegan, who won the Republican nomination.

The two winners Tuesday will face off in an Oct. 16 special election called by Gov. Chris Christie to fill the last 15 months of the seat previously held by Frank Lautenberg, who died at 89 in June.

Lonegan, former mayor of Bogota, is trying to buck history and become the first Republican elected to represent New Jersey in the Senate in 41 years. Booker, mayor of Newark, is trying to make history as the state's first black senator.

Booker promised to disregard old political rules and focus on finding common ground. Lonegan, who had harsh words for Booker as a celebrity who rubs elbows with “elites” in Hollywood, said that Democrats like Booker need to be stopped so the government does not deprive citizens of individual liberty.

Booker, 44, a rare New Jersey politician who was well known statewide before seeking statewide office, easily defeated U.S. Reps. Rush Holt and Frank Pallone — who both did well only in and near their districts — and state Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver. Despite facing experienced competition, he received around three-fifths of the votes.

A prolific social media user, Booker is a friend of celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey and Eva Longoria, both of whom made campaign appearances.

He has become known through his story: He grew up in a well-off northern New Jersey suburb as the son of IBM executives, played football at Stanford, was a Rhodes Scholar and went to law school at Yale before moving into one of the toughest Newark neighborhoods and launching a career in public service.

As mayor of a city known for crime, corruption and poverty, he's courted hundreds of millions from philanthropists, including Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

In his acceptance speech Tuesday night in Newark, he talked about not following political convention and trying to find common ground with adversaries, but also about some core liberal beliefs: raising the minimum wage, rewriting the tax code, protecting Social Security and Medicare and securing equal pay for women and the right to marry for gays.

“It’s a campaign that seeks to give testimony to the truth that the lines that divide us are insignificant compared to the ties that bind us,” he said.

Lonegan, 57, who also grew up in suburban Bergen County and played college football, served three terms as mayor of the small community of Bogota and then became the New Jersey director for the anti-tax group Americans for Prosperity, wasted no time Tuesday going after Booker’s approach and his celebrity, dismissing him as the candidate “anointed by Hollywood” and supported by “Silicon Valley moguls.”

“It’s going to look like a conservative versus a far-left liberal who’s going to paint a picture of a utopia where government can meet all of our needs,” Lonegan said in an interview with The Associated Press. “I think government is a problem.”

Lonegan, who opposes gay marriage, abortion rights and President Barack Obama’s health insurance overhaul, and generally wants to scale back the role of government, scoffed when told of Booker’s plan to match Lonegan’s “negative attacks with positive visions.”

“Maybe he can send out tweets from the Hundred Acre forest,” he said, referring to the setting for the Winnie the Pooh books.

During the primary campaign, Lonegan held news conferences to blast Booker on proposals for minimum wage increases, ties to a tech start-up and crime in Newark.

Lonegan received about 80 percent of the vote in a Republican primary where the only other candidate was a political newcomer, physician Alieta Eck.

While Booker is a close ally of Christie on Newark issues, the Republican governor said this week that he “fully anticipates” endorsing the winner of the Republican primary.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

August 15, 2013

By Angus Shaw

Associated Press

 

Zimbabwe's longtime President Robert Mugabe said Tuesday his party won "a resounding mandate" from voters to complete a sweeping black empowerment program to take over foreign and white-owned assets.

Mugabe said the program in Zimbabwe, widely criticized by Western countries, will be "pursued to its successful conclusion."

Outgoing Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, 61, is challenging the results of the July 31 election and alleges widespread vote rigging that gave Mugabe, 89, and his ZANU-PF party a commanding victory.

Addressing military parades on the annual Defense Forces holiday, Mugabe said voters ended an unwieldy coalition with Tsvangirai's opposition that was formed after the last violent and disputed elections in 2008.

Mugabe said the vote showed confidence in his party and its drive for "total economic emancipation" for prosperity and jobs.

"I extend my hearty congratulations to all of you for showing our foreign detractors our destiny lies in our hands," Mugabe said, speaking at the main sports stadium in Harare where the parades and parachuting displays, gymnastics and a soccer match between the uniformed services of Zimbabwe and regional ally Tanzania were held.

In his first public appearance since the election on the Heroes' Day holiday Monday, honoring guerrillas in the war the led to independence in 1980, Mugabe described his rivals as an enemy he disposed of in the election "like garbage."

On Tuesday he called them "some misguided fellow countrymen" who received backing from hostile Western nations and followed a regime-change agenda to oust him.

Tsvangirai's party had called for reforms to the military and police it has blamed for state orchestrated violence in the past.

"What they call security sector reform is when the enemy's aim is to dilute the efficiency of the Zimbabwe Defense Forces," Mugabe said. "We appeal to all Zimbabweans to resist the enemy's strategies and renewed advances by our erstwhile colonizers."

Britain, the former colonial power, and the United States have questioned whether the results of the July 31 poll represent a free and fair vote.

Mugabe, who for the first time this year inspected the parades from an open military jeep instead of walking through the ranks, said Britain has opposed black empowerment since 2000 when thousands of white farmers were forced to surrender their land.

Critics of the program say it disrupted Zimbabwe's agriculture-based economy, shut down industries and scared away foreign investment in mining and other businesses where owners were required to yield 51 percent control to blacks.

Mugabe, however, said empowerment succeeded in creating jobs and economic growth in other African countries in the post-colonial era where it had not drawn the same condemnation as in Zimbabwe.

In its election manifesto, Mugabe's party vowed to take control of the last 1,138 foreign and white-owned businesses in the country.

"This policy beneficial to indigenous Zimbabweans will be taken to its successful conclusion" under a new ZANU-PF government, Mugabe said.

Tsvangirai and leaders of his Movement for Democratic Change campaigned for liberalization the economy to attract Western investors. They stayed away from Tuesday's parades and Monday's ceremonies at a national cemetery outside Harare.

Parent Category: ROOT
Category: News

News

Curren Price cleans up ninth district during Earth Day

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L.A. City Councilman wants Jay Z concert stopped

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April 03, 2014 City News Service   Los Angeles City Councilman Jose Huizar wants his colleagues to put the brakes on rapper Jay-Z’s planned two-day...

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